2470

“D-Play”

2005
Graphic Treatment for IT House
TK Architecture
Los Angeles, CA

TK Architecture IT house website

 

“D-PLAY: STRUCTURE SIGN AND PLAY FOR THE DISPLAY OF HUMAN PRIVACY”     

     I wanted to make visual a very challenging philosophical text, which was written by Jacques Derrida and whose subject matter is Deconstruction. The IT House has its beginnings in a classic Modernist Meisian discourse of architecture. By cladding the Modernist IT structure in a text that attempted to challenge Modernist theory and was also equally appropriated by architects as the go-to theory for the movement of Deconstruction in architecture, the house becomes philosophical and conflicted.
     As it is applied to the IT house, the text becomes a scrim that is functioning as a privacy and decorative boscage. I am using it in a somewhat fragmented manner but still allow for the approaching viewer to begin reading the text from the outside, the public or outside of the text being larger in scale. Selected interior walls around the bathroom have the entire text facing the occupants viewpoint and functions as privacy scrim for the bathroom.
     Curly of the Three Stooges is present in one bathroom window scene posing as a thinker, perhaps pondering his own paradoxical situation. The Stooges were not Modernists; they worked outside of Modernism but were not necessarily Deconstructivists either. They brought instability to whatever situation that they encountered and he is there in the IT House looking out to the occupants pleading for understanding.
     The two abstract images are silhouettes that are appropriated from a film still that is from a 1938 Three Stooges episode titled “How High is Up?” in which the Stooges end up building a comical structure on top of a skyscraper, perhaps as a parody of the International Style of the 30’s. The abstract forms are also reminiscent of heroic sculpture from the 60’s and suggest the idea of placement of a sculpture in the courtyard area, the forms also equally suggest what early ideas of Deconstructed architecture looked like.